Calricia Bay Fox

I've Found A New Home!!

Calricia Bay Fox

Calricia Bay Fox
(Comar Bay Brummel x Foxette by Pierre of Aldachar)
1977 Bay Mare

The frightened three year old filly "Libby" is hiding behind her

In August of 1998, the owner of twenty-one-year old Calricia Bay Fox, an unidentified three-year-old filly, and two young bay stud colts called the feedlot owner and asked him to come pick up four horses he did not want anymore. When he arrived to haul them away, he found one of the colts had a very serious puncture wound to his eye that had gone untreated for what must have been a considerable length of time. It was badly infected, draining puss and blood, and appeared to be "melting" from deterioration and lack of care. When asked what happened to the colt, the owner said he had been injured, but did not realize the wound was so bad. He had not bothered to treat him. All four were wormy and terribly thin, and the lovely old mare desperately needed dental work. While the owner continues to keep at least one show horse with a large training barn in the area, those at home were being neglected.

Calricia Bay Fox at the feedlot

Calricia Bay Fox at the feedlot

These four horses were left over from a dispersal sale late last fall in Moreno Valley, CA. The authorities had forced the sale due to the owner's neglect and starvation of his horses. It is likely the colts are Bey Shah grandsons by the owner's stallion, but we will probably never know for certain. They were either never registered, or their papers were withheld when they were sent to the feedlot. Calricia Bay Fox was about three hundred pounds underweight, and the other babies were equally emaciated. The group was a heart wrenching sight … especially the once grand old mare and beautiful young colt suffering in the bright sun and greater than 100 degree summer heat with hordes of flies after the badly infected eye. Not only was he in a strange and frightening new place, he was having to adjust to life sightless on one side and undoubtedly in a great deal of pain.

Popeye

Popeye after being pulled
from the feedlot

Because the three babies had hardly any handling, they feared even the slightest advances. This made initial treatment of the wound at the feedlot extremely difficult. After the AHRN pulled the horses to safety, the vet was called out to examine the eye but did not hold out much hope for saving it. He initially deemed it unsalvageable, and recommended its removal. Since the colt did not have a name yet, the vet affectionately dubbed him "Popeye." The surgery was scheduled to remove what remained, and a plea for assistance was sent out to supporters. Then nothing short of a miracle happened …

During the next two weeks, Rose Ann waited for sufficient funds to come in to have the procedure performed, and tried to coordinate the surgery and necessary hauling for the youngster. For some reason things just were not falling into place as they usually did, and the young colt continued to endure the badly infected eye. Yet something we could not see was happening on the inside. The eye was actually healing!

When the vet examined him again, he was amazed at the progress and decided to hold off with the surgery. While regaining sight in the eye was probably too much to ask, we held out hope anyway. Amazingly, two months later, he had recovered some of his sight, and shape had returned to the eye. What had once been a cloudy, draining mass, cleared. The color is back to normal now, with slight scarring in the center, and his eyes have recovered their youthful and bright expression.

Popeye

Popeye today

Like Phoenix, Popeye has become an AHRN poster child and is one of the first rescues people ask about when inquiring about AHRN efforts. His buddy was given the name "Gulliver," and the two have become a couple of fun-loving clowns, often seen engaging in playful coltish antics! With care and attention, the two boys have blossomed into inquisitive and curious, attention-seeking carrot hounds.

The mischievous "Gulliver"

The Mischievous "Gulliver"

When faced with the challenge of bringing two stud colts to her small facility, Rose Ann was sure she had taken on more than she could handle. But these two youngsters, who have had little handling in their short lives, turned out to be very tractable and level headed. In time, they will make fabulous riding companions in their new homes. Rose Ann has become very attached to the little rascals, and saying good-bye to them will be especially difficult … Arthur and Merlin, on the other hand, will be happy to see them go! They're getting a little too old for their shenanigans …

Popeye has a new home with AHRN volunteer Cindy Henry, and has gone to live in the great state of Texas! Gulliver has a new home with a family in Idaho, and recently embarked on the next chapter in his life. While Rose Ann would love to keep them all, she knows too well that more will show up at the feedlot shortly needing homes. "It's been a delight to see them go from two terrified, skinny, unhappy messes, to two lovely, shiny beauties who have become more and more curious about humans, and more willing to interact with them," she says. "These are two that I am going to miss a lot, and regret not being able to have them around to watch them grow up. Often when they were in the turnout together, I'd stop to just watch and enjoy them while they played. I'd take in the reality of what might have been for these two beautiful, now healthy, youngsters. And in those moments, the payback for all the hard work was tenfold." With very limited space and a shoestring budget, room has to be made for the others that will need care and rehabilitation if they are to be saved.

Calricia Bay Fox and "Libby" after arriving at AHRN

Calricia Bay Fox and the three-year-old "Libby"
shortly after arriving at AHRN

Calricia Bay Fox is by the multiple National Top Ten Halter Stallion, and Champion English Pleasure, Pleasure Driving, Western Pleasure horse Comar Bay Brummel, full brother to National Champion Stallion, Reserve National Champion Western Pleasure, and Regional Champion English Pleasure Comar Bay Beau. Her dam Foxette, was a daughter of the beautiful champion producing halter and performance sire, Pierre of Aldachar. We were told by someone who recognized Calricia's name, that she was a California state halter champion in her younger years in some stiff competition. It is hard to believe such a mare could end up in these dire straits. She too, has progressed beautifully after dental work, worming, and proper nutrition, and recently went to her new home in Kentucky to live out her days. She has a new family in Walter, Anne, and Kelby Congleton, and they consider it a great honor to be able to give a home to such a special mare.

Calricia Bay Fox shortly before leaving AHRN for Kentucky

Calricia Bay Fox shortly before leaving AHRN
for her new family in Kentucky

The young three-year-old filly, who we have affectionately named "Libby," has been a special challenge and will require some additional professional training to overcome her fears. While Calricia Bay Fox does have an offspring about 3 years old, the former (and still registered) owner does not believe "Libby" is her daughter as they were not sold together. "Libby" is very skittish and although wants to trust, is having a difficult time gaining the courage due to limited or harsh handling in her formative years. Fortunately, she has a committed and loving home in Idaho with the same family that is taking Santina, and will go there once she has a little more life experience under her belt. She is a beautiful, sweet girl that needs a slow and gentle hand to help her shine. And most certainly, she will.

"Libby" at the feedlot

"Libby" at the feedlot

Calricia Bay Fox and Libby shortly after arriving at AHRN

Calricia Bay Fox and the three-year-old "Libby"
shortly after arriving at AHRN

UPDATE: Here are some new pictures of Calricia Bay Fox with her new family, the Congletons in Kentucky, along with the story of their life with her so far:

Calricia Bay Fox and Walter Congleton

Calricia Bay Fox and Walter Congleton

Walter and I know a lot of people wondered why we chose to adopt a 21 year Arabian mare from a California feedlot and especially when we showed them her picture. What they saw was an old half-starved, sad eyed creature. Actually, they were even more stunned to find we'd adopted her site unseen and received her picture later. We got that look of "Have you lost your mind?" I've found when you choose to follow your heart and intuition you get a lot of those looks. When we did see Calley's picture we knew she had no hope left and was giving up on life. Her eyes said it all. The "light of life" was slowly fading.

Calricia Bay Fox and Walter and Kelby Congleton

Calricia Bay Fox and Walter and Kelby Congleton

Calricia Bay Fox deserved better. Here was a Comar Bay Brummel daughter, Azraff granddaughter and most of you know the rest of her top line. It's been said she received the title of California Halter Champion at age 4 and now this beauty of a mare was now being rewarded by standing in a California feedlot after having been sold in a dispersal sale less than a year ago. Thus steps in, Arabian Horse Rescue Network and Roseann Nemes, AHRN's director.

Calricia Bay Fox and Kelby Congleton

Calricia Bay Fox and Kelby Congleton

Our son said from the day Calley arrived that she was his and what he said turned out to be true for Calley chose Kelby as well. Watching the two of them is magic and she will be his companion for the rest of her life. She will be the one he tells his secrets, desires and I'm sure how mad he is at Mom and Dad on certain days, as well as, how much he'd rather stay home with her than go to school. When Roseann received the pictures of Kelby and Calley together she said, "That old mare will take care of that boy." and I believe she' s right. I asked Kelby, when I started writing this, what was it liked best about Calley. Kelby said riding her and just laying on her back. He said it was like being in a bumpy bed of fur and she kept him warm. It's wonderful for me to know he feels that comfortable on the back of this ole mare.

Calricia Bay Fox and Kelby Congleton

Calley and Kelby

We love this old mare, although I'm hesitant to say old, because she now looks and acts like a ten year old. It's amazing what some dental work and groceries can do for a horse. It's even more amazing what love can achieve. Thanks to Roseann Nemes, and all the workerbees of AHRN, Calley got a second chance at life and we got the opportunity to give it to her. Without the AHRN, Calley would be gone forever and we would have missed out on the best kind of magic in the world. This love between Kelby and Calley.

Anne, Walter & Kelby Congleton

Pedigree

Calricia Bay Fox
1977 Bay Mare
AHR# 170896

Comar Bay Brummel Azraff *Raffles
*Azja IV
Rose of Mirage Al-Marah Ibn Indraff
Amulet
Foxette Pierre of Aldachar Rafferty
Rasoulma
Mufissa Musafir
Nafissa

For Further Information:

Write Us! Arabian Horse Rescue Network
P.O. Box 4603
Sunland, CA 91041-4603
Phone: 818-353-9577

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